Saturday, March 31, 2007

Strawberry Bank Berrys revisited

I have just posted the following message on the Berry forums and thought I should share it here, also.

"I posted recently about a new online database for the Strawbery Banke Berrys. That database has now been expanded and enhanced and may be found here:

http://tinyurl.com/2w4m9j

In addition, I have now put the Berry Family Cemetery just outside Rye, NH, online. This consists of photographic overviews of the cemetery itself as well as photographs of each of the 52 gravestones located there. It may be found here:

http://tinyurl.com/yq5rzn

As before, the purpose of both these offerings is to encourage members of this Berry family to participate in the Berry Family DNA Project, the particulars of which may be seen here:

http://www.tiny.cc/BerryDNA

In any event, I would appreciate any additions or corrections offered in order to keep these sites as useful as possible."

original Strawbery Banke Berrys post.

Friday, March 30, 2007

Choose/Contact a Place Where Records Are Stored
14 of 26

Choose/Contact a Place Where Records Are Stored

Thursday, March 29, 2007

Choose a Record Type
13 of 26

Sorry.    Nothing going on.    Back to the 'fallback' video -

Choose a Record Type

Tuesday, March 27, 2007

Orange Co., NC Berrys

New results for the Orange Co., NC Berrys.    Jeff's, #44, Y-DNA37 results arrived yesterday.    Five of the six members of that family now have 37 markers.    I decided to go ahead and run new tables and a cladogram.    I was going to have the utility generate a modal to compare everyone to but, as it turns out, Wiley, #18, is modal for the group at this time, hence the highlighting of his data.

First, here are the haplotypes for each.
Next, Genetic distances.
And Time to Most Recent Common Ancestor, at 75% probability.
And finally, their cladogram for the five that have tested 37 markers.It would be interesting to see where Ken, #83, might fit in here if he had 37 markers.

It's also interesting to compare their yAncestry with their TMRCA and their cladogram.
Jeff and Ken both need to upload their results to YSearch.

Monday, March 26, 2007

New Project Member

We have a new Project member, Dennis Raymond Berry, #89, who is our 93rd member.    Dennis comes to us from the Genographic Project where he already has his first 12 markers and Y-HAP-Backbone tests done, placing him in haplogroup I.    Unfortunately, Dennis doesn't match anyone we know about.

Although it won't help get him any closer to folks we're aware of now, I would recommend that he upgrade to 37 markers so that when a match does come along he'll know right away whether it is legitimate or spurious.    It would also be a good idea to upload his results to YSearch and then remember to upload any additional results he may get.

Welcome Dennis.

Saturday, March 24, 2007

SNPs

Two of our participants have recently received results of SNP testing.    Walter, #34, has gotten his Y-HAP-Backbone test results of M269+ placing him in haplogroup R1b1c.    Richard, #82, has gotten his DeepSNP-R1b results of M173+ M207+ M269+ M343+ P25+ M126- M153- M160- M18- M222- M37- M65- M73- P66- SRY2627- placing him in haplogroup R1b1c.    What's the difference, you ask?    I don't know.    Let's take a look.

Why a SNP test?    SNP markers define which haplogroup you are in.
What is a SNP test?    [Answer]

Where most of our DNA testing deals with attempting to advance our genealogy by determining and comparing our haplotypes through STR testing, others, such as SNP testing, attempt to discover our genetic history and ethnic origins themselves.

Friday, March 23, 2007

Information Sources Defined
12 of 26

Well, yesterday was the day I was supposed to receive the results of my (due Nov 27) last two 'advanced' tests.    Rats!    Can you guess whether I did?    O.K., another movie.

Information Sources Defined

Thursday, March 22, 2007

The Strawberry Bank Berrys

I believe that I should mention the Strawberry Bank Berrys again in hopes of drumming up some interest in DNA testing among the living Berry surnamed descendants of that group.    I now have the Strawberry Bank Berrys database online with just under 1000 folks in it and visually tweaked to the point that I think it's somewhat set until others start offering additions or corrections to it.

I'm a little surprised that information on several of these family lines seems to be readily available on the internet, indicating to me enough people currently interested in them to do the work, while we have none we know to have tested.

I mentioned the other day that there is a claim by some of a relationship between the Strawberry Bank Berrys and the Berry Plain Berrys.1    The migration patterns detailed in Albion's Seed could support this as well as the fact that the Strawberry Bank Berrys family traditions seem to be that they, like the Berry Plain Berrys, are of English descent.    DNA testing could possibly shed some light on this hypothesis as well.

One small (perhaps) controversy that I discovered doing my research is that there seems to be a school of thought that Thaddeus Berry is a son of William Berry, 1610-1654, and another that he is an immigrant himself, separate from the line of William the immigrant, and Irish to boot.    Hopefully there are Berrys out there who would like to explore those assertions.

And, TODAY'S the day.

Tuesday, March 20, 2007

In Memoriam


     In the four years since we invaded Iraq on March 20, 2003

               3,218 U.S. service members have been killed,

                    23,417 U.S. service members have been wounded, in

                         "W"'s War.


                            "When a man don’t use good judgment it’s the innocent who pays"

                                                                                                                             -- Echo Mountain


Click here to Think Peace

Monday, March 19, 2007

Choose a Source
11 of 26

Choose a Source

Friday, March 16, 2007

Food for thought.

New results again!    This time Cameron, #58, of the Augusta/Washington Co. Berrys who matches exactly through 37 markers Sterling, #5, jim, #7, and Keith, #37.    How does that work?    Looking at yAncestry lines you might expect Sterling and Keith to match.    ...and maybe jim?    But who would have expected Cameron to match to 37 markers?    It's a puzzlement.

It's been a month now since I posted our pending orders and their 'expected' dates, so here goes:
Kit      
Product Test Name Batch EstResultDate
13030
DYS485 DYS485 Jim,#7 174 11/27/2006*
DYS495 DYS495 174
DXYS156 DXYS156 196 4/30/2007
DYS714 DYS714 196
DYS716 DYS716 196
DYS717 DYS717 196
DYS726 DYS726 196

37125
Y-Refine12to37 Y-DNA26-37 Markers Jeffery#44 192 4/04/2007

53305
Y-Refine37to67 Y-DNA38-47 Markers David#57 195 4/23/2007
Y-DNA48-60 Markers
Y-DNA61-67 Markers
56996
Y-Refine12to37 Y-DNA13-25 Markers Patrick#60 194 4/18/2007
Y-DNA26-37 Markers
79452
DeepSNP-R1b DSNP-R1b Richard,#82 192 4/02/2007

*Results for your test are expected to be posted by 3/22/07.

Thursday, March 15, 2007

Berry Project mtDNA analysis

I took the receipt of Mary Ann's HVR2 results the other day for the incentive to do a short analysis of the Project mtDNA data for those who have had both HVR1 and HVR2 tested.    'Analysis' is a little strong for what I'm doing here, actually.    It's more like gathering, comparing and presenting data.    I'm afraid that I can't begin to tell you what it means.

Summary of mtDNA Markers

HVR1 (+16000)HVR2
Markers1
6
5
1
9
C
1
6
1
8
9
C
1
6
1
2
6
C
1
6
2
9
4
T
Unique
Mutations
2
6
3
G
3
1
5
.
1
C
7
3
G
3
0
9
.
1
C
5
2
4
.
2
A
5
2
4
.
1
C
Unique
Mutations
Freq(%)
Count
100.0
6
33.3
2
33.3
2
33.3
2
16.7
1
100.0
6
100.0
6
66.7
4
50.0
3
33.3
2
33.3
2
16.7
1
IDHG
ABYA7H+   ++ +  196C
84XEKH+   ++    
N25QDR*+   311C++++++295A,309.2C
RQMXCT*++++183C,182C,298C+++   195C
3XCBKT2+ ++296T,304C++++  458T
55KEYU2++  051G,129C,256T+++ ++217C,340T,508G
Notes:
  1. Red Markers indicate >50% of samples tested were positive for marker
  2. * Data Entries are omitted in Genetic Distance Calculations (No HVR2 Data)
  3. * Markers are ignored in Genetic Distance Calculations
  4. + in column indicates the samples tested positive for marker
  5. blank in column indicates the samples tested negative for marker
  6. N in column indicates the samples were not tested for marker and omitted from frequency calculations

Genetic Distance Report

NameA
B
Y
A
7
8
4
X
E
K
N
2
5
Q
D
R
Q
M
X
C
3
X
C
B
K
5
5
K
E
Y
ABYA702710712
84XEK2078710
N25QD770131011
RQMXC108130914
3XCBK77109015
55KEY12101114150
Genetic Distance 0 1 2 3 > 3
A lower number in a column indicates a closer match
The above tables created with mtDNAtool version 0.48

Wednesday, March 14, 2007

When it rains . . .

More new results!    This time it was Jeff's, #44, Y-DNA13-25 markers portion of his Y-Refine12to37 order, come in a bit early.

New database online!    You'll recall that I mentioned the other day that I've been wanting to put a Strawberry Bank Berrys database online.    Well, I've done some reading and online 'research' and my 20 some folks have swelled to a little over 700 and I've gone ahead and put it online.    It's a little rough.    My new Reunion 9.01 database program has a few glitches still and one shows up here in that my database has no sources with it.    I promise you that they exist and will be there as soon as the Leister folks get it fixed.

I'm hoping to generate some interest from the descendants of that line to join us in DNA testing.    It would not only help to confirm or refute some of the questioned relationships there, but also to see whether that line might be related to any of our others.    Some think that there is a relationship between the Strawberry Bank Berrys and Henry Berry of the Berry Plain Berrys??    Take a look.

Another friendly reminder - If you've been considering upgrading or ordering any new tests where FTDNA already has your DNA sample on hand, take this as a sign that TODAY'S the day to do it.    It will save you up to a week on getting your results back.    Place the order before 4:30 or so this afternoon, Mountain Time, to avoid waiting up to a week additional for the next batch to be shipped out.    Hm-m-m-m-m.    Good idea!    Think I'll go ahead and order those couple or so other advanced order markers I've been looking at.

Tuesday, March 13, 2007

. . . it pours!

Well, FINALLY!    Mary Ann's, #m4, results are in!    Originally expected on 1/22/07 Mary Ann's HVR2 results arrived yesterday morning and are posted.    A quick reminder to Mary Ann and to all of you  -   Whenever you get new results, be sure to upload them to ySearch or, as in this case, mitosearch.    It's very easy to do.    Simply click on the darkened line that says 'Click here to upload' found in your 'Matches' tab on your FTDNA personal page.    I'm assuming that most of us are doing this to connect with hitherto unknown cousins?    YSearch and Mitosearch are great tools for doing this but they can't find you if your results aren't there.

Another good thing to do to further that objective is to upload your GEDCOM through the link that FTDNA has provided.    Mary Ann does have a match on both HVR1 and HVR2 and, as luck would have it, her match has uploaded his/her GEDCOM.    Mary Ann can click on her match's link and learn that her match's maternal line is Kidd, Winchester, Hobbs, Averitt, Cooper, Douglas, Blakemore, Tomlin and Steal.    She can then look to see if any of these surnames are also included in her maternal line.

And, three of my, #7, five advanced marker order results came in later in the day.    They are DYS434 9, DYS435 11 and DYS643 13.    Really no biggie since I don't even have anyone else to compare them to.    I think that it's just that I ordered them last October and I thought they'd taken enough time.    Still two to go.

And, if that weren't enough, later last night I got a notice from SMGF that they have just added new haplotypes and genealogies to the Sorenson mtDNA and Y-Chromosome databases.    I did a quick check of the Y-DNA databases and found that I have 4 or 5 additional markers posted, one new, DYS445, and John, #39, has two additional markers posted.    I'll talk about them later when I have more time.    I believe that everyone else stayed the same.

I haven't had an opportunity to check newly posted mtDNA sequences yet.    Nor am I as comfortable finding my way around that database.    I'll do some looking but I'll mostly have to rely on you all to tell me when you find your matrilineal line posted there.

Monday, March 12, 2007

Begin a Research Log
10 of 26

I'm always here over the weekend.    I guess I expect them to be in the lab, too.    Still no results.    Sorry.

Begin a Research Log

Sunday, March 11, 2007

Choose a Research Question
9 of 26

Choose a Research Question

Friday, March 09, 2007

Whee-e-e-e . . . .

Well, finally, some new results.    Gerald, #85, got his Y-DNA12 results a couple days early.    As expected, he matched the Berry Plain Berrys.

Maybe Mary Ann, #m4, and I, #7, will get lucky this time.    We've both been told that we can expect our long overdue results by March 9.   That's today.    I guess we'll see.

Thursday, March 08, 2007

Identify Missing or Unverified Information
8 of 26

Identify Missing or Unverified Information

Wednesday, March 07, 2007

Step 2 - Decide What You Want to Learn
7 of 26

Rats!    Nothing coming out of FTDNA (nothing since Feb. 22!) and no new 'discoveries' to talk about.

Guess it's another movie:

Step 2 - Decide What You Want to Learn

Tuesday, March 06, 2007

Google Books

Those of you who have not yet discovered Google Books, I'm here to tell you that you should!    Just looking around, as I often do, on the internet and had heard a mention of Google Books in the past so thought I'd try it.    First I typed 'Berry Genealogy' into the Google search bar and selected 'Books'.    If 'Books' is not showing as a selection you may have to click the 'More >>' above the search bar to find it.    You will then be presented with a list of books containing your search term, some offering a 'snippet view', some a 'limited preview' and some a 'full view'.


In addition, you will notice under the search box you are now offered the opportunity to search for 'All books' or 'Full view books'.    Well, because my experience has always been that the particular page I was interested in was 'not available', I opted to limit my search to 'Full view books'.

I don't know whether there are full view books available for other reasons or not, but Google has undertaken a project to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible.    A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired.

I decided to search 'Full view books' for "Thomas Berry", a pretty common name in many lines.    As serendipity would have it, my first offering shown was History of the Town of Rye, New Hampshire: from its discovery and settlement to December 31, 1903 - Page 305.    Well, I've been interested for a little while now in researching the 'Strawberry Bank Berrys' and have started a very small 20 person database from internet sources.

Now, thanks to Google Books, I have on my desktop a downloaded .pdf copy of all 675 pages of History of the Town of Rye, New Hampshire: from its discovery and settlement to December 31, 1903 by Langdon B. Parsons which I expect to help a lot in that particular research project.

Take a look.    You, too, may find a jewel.

Monday, March 05, 2007

Organize and Preserve
6 of 26

I guess no one works in the labs on weekends.    At least, no new results are forthcoming.    Ergo, the movie:

Organize and Preserve

Sunday, March 04, 2007

more Sunday funnies

The Y-chromosome is a powerful tool for population geneticists to study human evolutionary history.    Haploid and largely non-recombining, it should contain a simple record of past mutational events.    However, this apparent simplicity is compromised by Y-linked duplicons, which make up approximately 35% of this chromosome; 25% of these duplicons are large inverted repeats (palindromes).    For microsatellites lying in these palindromes, two loci cannot be easily distinguished due to PCR co-amplification, and this order misspecification of alleles generates an additional variance component.    Due to this ambiguity, population geneticists have traditionally used an arbitrary method to assign the alleles (shorter allele to locus 1, larger allele to locus 2).    Here, we simulate these posterior estimate distributions under three different novel allele assignment priors and compare this with the original method.    We use a sample of 33 human populations, typed for duplicated microsatellites lying within palindrome P8, to illustrate our approach.    We show that both intra- and inter-population statistics can be dramatically affected by order misspecification. Surprisingly, matrices of pairwise F-statistics or distance estimates appear far less sensitive to order misspecification and remain relatively unchanged under the priors considered, suggesting that these microsatellites can be considered as useful markers for population genetic studies using an appropriate data treatment.    Duplicated microsatellites represent an attractive source of information to investigate the extensive structural polymorphism observed among human Y chromosomes, as well as processes of intra-chromosomal gene conversion acting between duplicons.

Why is he telling us this, you ask?    This is an abstract of a scientific paper in the process of publication concerning the handling of multi-copy markers on the Y chromosome written by four guys named Balaresque, Sibert, Heyer and Crouau-Roy.

I don't know what it says (yet) either but I believe it's talking about something that we may have an interest in so I'll try to find out.    I can tell that it's talking about multi-copy markers that we've discussed previously concerning recLOH events and we have also developed a Non-recLOH Event Multi-copy Marker Distance Counting Protocol.

The paper's aim is to present the results of their study of how the accepted convention of reporting the values of multi-copy markers from low to high may affect the outcomes of various population studies and, I think, they're saying that the convention has surprisingly little effect on distance estimates.    I'll try to find out.    Input welcomed.

Saturday, March 03, 2007

Family History Interviews
5 of 26

Well, not enough news for a whole post by itself but a Y-Refine37to67 upgrade was just ordered for David, #57.    That will make four of the nine Culpeper Co. Berrys with at least 67 markers tested.

Family History Interviews

Friday, March 02, 2007

Obituary

Special from the Braxton Citizens' News -

The Pillsbury Doughboy Death and Funeral Arrangements


Sad news... Please join me in remembering a great icon of the entertainment community.

The Pillsbury Doughboy died yesterday, December 28, of a yeast infection and trauma complications from repeated pokes in the belly.    He was 71.

Doughboy was buried in a lightly greased coffin.    Dozens of celebrities turned out to pay their respects, including Mrs. Butterworth, Hungry Jack, the California Raisins, Betty Crocker, the Hostess Twinkies, and Captain Crunch.    The gravesite was piled high with flours.

Aunt Jemima delivered the eulogy and lovingly described Doughboy as a man who never knew how much he was kneaded.    Doughboy rose quickly in show business, but his later life was filled with turnovers.    He was not considered a very smart cookie, wasting much of his dough on half-baked schemes.    Despite being a little flaky at times he still was a crusty old man and was considered a positive roll model for millions.

Doughboy is survived by his wife Play Dough, two children, John Dough and Jane Dough, plus they had one in the oven.    He is also survived by his elderly father, Pop Tart.

The funeral was held at 3:50 for about 20 minutes.

If this made you smile for even a brief second, please rise to the occasion and take time to pass it on and share that smile with someone else who may be having a crumby day and kneads it.

Thursday, March 01, 2007

Gathering Family History Information
4 of 26

Well, today's the day that I've been told I'd get results from my FTDNA advanced marker order placed sometime last October and with an 'expected results' date of Nov. 27.    They're not here yet but I guess the day's not over either.    I'm not actually sure why I'm so impatient about them.    By themselves they don't mean anything and no one else in the family has ordered them to compare with.   I guess it just seems that they've had my money long enough that I ought to have a return on it.

To be fair, though, the lab running these tests IS a new start up by FTDNA, run by Thomas Krahn, formerly of DNA FP who, in addition to getting new equipment purchased and up and running, had to move himself and his family over here from Germany.    When he ran his own business in Germany, Thomas was always one of the 'good guys' offering new tests and whatever else he could to push this new science/hobby forward and I'm sure he'll continue to do that in his new role with FTDNA.

Patrick's, #60, estimated results date for his new Y-Refine12to37 order has now been given as April 18, 2007.

And now the movie:

Gathering Family History Information